6.12.12

Thoughts on constantly achieving this mind-body practice / "More than being proud to be seen in novelty"



{liberatormagazine.com exclusive feature}

In "Literacy: Reading the Word & the World", Paulo Freire recalls an adult literacy workbook in Sao Tome with pictures in it. Next to a picture of a group of young people swimming it is written, "It is by swimming that one learns to swim." Next to a picture of youths working it is written, "It is by working that one learns to work." And at the bottom of the page it is written, "By practicing we learn to practice better." A profound truth on the importance of mind-body practice for the simple sake of practicing living better.

But there's just something about the way Bird put it -- this fusion of jazz and mdw ntr -- that is so sweet:

Music is your own experience, your thoughts, your wisdom. If you don’t live it, it won’t come out of your horn.”
-Charlie Parker

And perhaps this is what we feel when we get tired of taking pictures of moments. If, however, we choose for our processes of literacy to never end, to always tell our stories humbly, then all of our texts and works (written words, spoken words, photos, videos, songs, performances) aren't just pictures of individual moments, but also snapshots of a collective eternity full of texts and works (stories) that guide us. We sort of learn that our stories are something valuable when we learn that others have preserved their stories, but we only know why stories are preserved when we come to know why our stories are worth preserving. Connection is necessary to that process. And faith is the result of such connection. Likewise, we know good listening because we've witnessed it and can testify to its power. The more we practice good listening, in faith, the more we find ourselves guided by the bodies of stories out there, the less we find ourselves guided by just our individual moments. More than being proud to be seen in novelty, we're honored -- at peace -- when we practice better, with the possibility of being a literal part of the classic; a shining measure of time in a timeless eternity.

Originally Posted 8/4/2011