How To Get Out The Game / Interview w/ a Former Crack Dealer



What is plaguing the black community is obvious. Crack cocaine was introduced to black communities during the early 1980’s by the CIA, many speculate, as an international money making scheme to fund foreign wars in both Nicaragua and Iran. The urban black population owns no planes, helicopters, runways or launch pads. The potent drug has become the idolized rock we hear about daily in mainstream music. Former drug dealers turned rappers are the Cinderella stories of our time, but the stories are getting old. The Liberator sat down for an in-depth interview with a man who knows the game and has lived the first chapter of the Cinderella story. Fortunately, he closed the book before the fairytale was over.

“It’s a gamble. So many illusions you gotta play, sometimes you gotta lie. You win or you loose ain’t no in-between.”

His words caress the heart like truth. That they appear in the Liberator is no coincidence.

Question: How are our kids, brothers, sisters, even mothers and fathers getting caught up in this mess?

Answer: It’s a part of life actually, everybody wanna make it. It depends how you want to make it. Sellin’ is accessible but hard. You gotta’ be an accountant cause you gotta’ get that next brick. You’re introduced through TV, mass media, that’s your intro.

Q: Why can’t cats just “say no?”

A: (He laughs) It’s part of culture. As America grows so does drugs, they go hand in hand, if it’s prescription, legal, illegal, alcohol--drugs is profitable. Mother-f***ers is making livin's, makin’ livin’s off of sellin’ drugs. In this life at least.

Q: But it’s not inescapable right?

A: It’s ingrained. The U.S. they been gangsterin’ cats ever since whenever. If drugs go away, the culture has to leave. Legal and illegal things make America grow.

Q: How does the U.S. metaphor mix in?

A: Just like a person in the hood, he dumpin’ and he got a job. Just like America supplying guns to a country, speadin’ confusion, they kill each other and America comes in and starts gangsterin' them cats.

Q: Is there any little bit of hope at all?

A: Hope is to graduate through the game and live through another day, that’s the only hope. Or… transformin’ the game.

Q: Explain.

A: You got cats who take what they make in the game and turn around and do something else with it. Like real estate. All them Corlion cats, them niggas was smart, but they was drug dealers.

Q: If you’re trying to do something positive with drug money it seems like the most positive thing you could do is to stop profiting from it.

A: Cats respected Cliff Huxtable. But you know who they wanted to be like? Tony Montana [Scarface]. They wanna’ live like Tony Montana and not get killed. They love style and the girls like it too. [Girls are] really attracted to warriors. But the warriors turned out to be gangbangers and dealers. They like that person who stands up against the grain, that “I won’t be denied” attitude. Yes, it’s not good cause sometimes you gotta’ lie, you gotta’ sell a product to someone that you know is bad for you. You going against your natural self.

Q: You make it sound like there’s no way out. The article is called “how to get out.”

A: (With a chuckle) You gotta find something else to supply that business habit. You like being able to sell your product, you out there movin’ around, being communal with your brothers. Ya’ll makin’ a unit, there’s a lot of exchangin’ goin’ on.

Q: So taking the entrepreneurial skills and making more positive moves with them?

A: That’s a way. The best way is to get your spirituality right, get some spiritual food, that should help change your mind state. Eat better food. Watching betting things. Doing better things. A lot of times we make bad decisions because we don’t have enough O2 (oxygen) in our brains, clogged up with coffee sugar, crack, marijuana for some. Those are the elements that get us off that spiritual plane that we be on.

Q: That seems like common sense, now it sounds too easy.

A: It’s not just the game it’s the wager involved.

Q: So how is a poor person supposed to choose those good things over a pile of money?

A: Your sustainer is God. You’re totally dependant on god, whether good or bad. So there’s no reason for you to run for the money. You have a free will to do wrong or right but your life is written for you. Man wants other than what God wants for him. That’s the problem, you want more. Man is not content. Some men, most men, those men. Whoever those men are. (Smiles)

Q: And if God doesn’t feed me today?

A: If you don’t eat today, or if you get one meal, your content with one meal. The reasons they go crazy is because they are living two lives. If you know you’re doing something that can send you to hell that will drive you insane.

Q: Some people worry that people aren’t creative enough to find other ways to make money. It’s either the NBA or the music industry.

A: They used to sell rabbits. It’s cool to eat, but not that good of an animal. They was selling it and getting’ money. It wasn’t the best product, but they went out and got something to sell. It was called being creative.

Q: Last words?

A: I repent. I know everything that I’ve done is not going to be accepted, because I do some things that I know not to do. That’s how it goes.

{liberatormagazine.com exclusive feature}
by Brian Hughes Kasoro (The Liberator 3.1 #5)

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